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March 19, 2002
Charles Caleb Colton said, in his book "Lacon", that imitation is the sincerest of flattery. This proverb has been revised to called imitation the "sincerest form of flattery". Those who have heard this but did not yield to acknowledge the moral of Aesop's fable "The Fox and the Stork" are concealing something. Aesop warned the reader of this fable to not trust flatterers. When mimics imitate people for whom they are overtly mocking, does mockery through imitation constitute imitation? When someone imitates your work and skills only to supercede you in the position of higher power, do they flatter you?